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Archive for February, 2013

lead paint danger If your home was built before 1978 when the use of lead paint was banned, then there are certain precautions that you and your contractor need to take before beginning any work on your house that will disturb the paint on the inside or outside of your home. In 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency began requiring that contractors who disturb painted surfaces of houses, schools, and child care facilities be certified to work with lead paint. This certification is called the Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) certification and ensures that certified contractors have been trained to safely work on buildings that may have been painted with lead-based paint to prevent potential lead poisoning. Lead poisoning can occur when lead-based paint is ingested or its dust is inhaled. When a surface painted with lead paint is disturbed by activities like scraping, sanding, drilling, or sawing, dust or chips may be thrown into the air, creating a potential hazard. RRP certified contractors know how to safely handle these jobs and the cleanup required to prevent poisoning. RRP certified contractors like John Temmel at Temmel Siding are trained by EPA-approved training facilities and are certified by their state. Some states have slightly different rules than the federal rules, but all certified contractors are trained by a federally-approved facility. According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia’s RRP rules closely follow those laid out by the EPA. Remember that lead paint is only a threat if the painted surface is disturbed or if the surface suffers from weather or time related damage like chipping or peeling. If your walls appear to be in good shape and you are not planning on having any work done on your home, your risk factor for lead poisoning is very low as lead only poses a threat if it is inhaled or ingested. However, if you are concerned, you can find more information about having your home tested at: http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadtest.pdf. photo credit: Vanessa / photoxpress

deck installation

It may not look like much now, but this work in progress is going to be a beautiful addition to this house. In the front, we have built a two-story porch that will have tiled floors on the second story and 8 12” round columns on both stories. In the rear of the house, French doors will open up to the back deck, which will have a beautiful arbor above it. Front porches like the one above are classic features of inviting, southern-style homes, and are a great way to improve the look and value of your home. Check out some of our other porches and decks that we have worked on here.

Stucco Removal FAQ

Posted on:
stucco removal If your house currently has a stucco finished exterior, it will need to be removed before installing siding or masonry, because over time stucco can crack or peel away, which would cause costly complications later on if not first removed. Even if you are not looking to upgrade the exterior of your house, you may still need to have the stucco removed if it is bubbling or cracking. If your house has a stucco finish, check out this FAQ to see if it needs to be removed and how we can help.
Q. When does stucco need to be removed? A. Stucco must be removed before siding or masonry is installed, or if it has a damaged area of over 18 to 24 inches; a damaged area this large will likely fall.Q. What does damaged stucco look like? A. Damaged stucco has cracks, chips, and bubbles that are the result of a settling house or failing bond.Q. How is stucco removed? A. Stucco is removed by using heavy-duty hammers, saws, crowbars, chisels, tin snips, wire brushes, and tons of hard work. The stucco is cut, cracked, and pried off. Then the heavy-duty chicken wire beneath the stucco is cut and pulled off. Q. Can I do it myself? A. Stucco removal is hard, hard work, and if not done correctly can ruin the exterior of a house. It is not a DIY project for the inexperienced, and for individuals requires weeks of commitment, not to mention time spent restoring the new outside of the house. Your safest best is to leave it up to professionals who are trained to give you the best result. Q. Hm. Will you do it for me? A. Absolutely. Check out our stucco removal work and give us a call today. photo credit: pgm / photoxpress

James Hardie Siding

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